Opportunity: Meet Texas editors

Team: The following comes from the Texas Associated Press Managing Editors

The Texas Associated Press Managing Editors are having their convention in Corpus Christi at the Omni hotel on April 13-15, and we’d like to see you and your students there.

 Students are not only encouraged to attend, but urged to do so. Editors from throughout Texas – many with job opportunities – will be on hand. This is a tremendous opportunity for students to meet editors.

A special panel discussion and reception called Meet the Editors has been scheduled Friday, April 13, from 3:30 – 6 p.m. At Del Mar College. We’ll have a few more specifics as the date gets closer.

The panel discussion will be about how to land that first gig out of school. Panelists will include not only editors, but recently graduated students who got that first job. A reception will be held afterward where journalists can meet one-on-one with editors. Students are encouraged to bring their resumes.

Additionally, registration for the convention through the weekend is free to students. Yes, free. 

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Newsletter critique, 1-17-18

Staff:

Each day, you’ll receive feedback on your individual contributions to The Shorthorn’s news report, as well as feedback on the issue as a whole. This information is posted in the newsroom on the bulletin board, along with a summary highlighting the best work – and that which needs improvement. You should read the entire critique – not just your work – and use the information to improve a little each day.

Beth Francesco
Director of Student Publications

The Shorthorn e-newsletter, Jan. 17, 2018

The best thing in the newsletter: Kyle did a great job incorporating a specific anecdote to paint a picture of some of the issues Arlington residents have with short-term rental properties in their neighborhoods:

Arlington resident Robert Phillips, 53, gave an anecdotal example from his University Drive neighborhood where a residence had 30 people in a three-bedroom home and was being advertised as a party house.

“It doesn’t happen every week, but it is annoying,” Phillips said. “The noise is a problem; the trash is a problem.”

The anecdote continues, thoroughly letting the reader experience what he has. Instead of quoting the entire passage, Kyle used the anecdote to set up a good quote. Nicely done! Continue reading

Internship opportunity: UNT Health Science Center

Job posting—intern

Employee Communications Intern (paid, part-time)

Office of Brand and Communication

UNT Health Science Center

3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, Texas

 

 

The Office of Brand and Communication Department at the University of North Texas Health Science Center (UNTHSC) in Fort Worth is seeking to hire an Employee Communications Intern.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to, assisting with:

  • Writing, editing and posting content for UNTHSC’s intranet, internal electronic newsletter and other employee communication tools
  • Informal photography for these communication tools
  • Promotions and preparations for activities to encourage faculty and staff engagement in UNTHSC’s mission, vision, purpose and strategic plan (Examples include on-campus employee fairs and tours)
  • Helping develop new strategic communication programs designed to enhance employee engagement
  • Helping maintain tools to monitor the success of these programs

Continue reading

Let’s get social. For real.

Part of an ongoing blog series of notes and tips from the 2017 College Media Association/Associated Collegiate Press national convention. Search by topic or “collegemedia17” on this site to find more, or #collegemedia17 on Twitter. The following is compiled by Victoria Raines.

Tools to Increase Your Social Media Following

  • There is a sense that these companies that create these awesome social media tools don’t care about us as individuals. You might lose what you have come to rely on.
  • Facebook announced they launched a new newsfeed in five different countries that eliminates all news organizations from your feed.
  • Don’t’ put all your stock in one tool. Social media is rapidly changing and unreliable.
  • Facebook shows you what you care about and what you care about is what you click on.
  • Patreon.com allows you to charge people money for your content. When they buy into you, they are invested in your work.
  • You have to build a following that interacts with your work.

Repurposing Print Content for Social

  • Every post should have a picture.
  • Go with the photographer to get a shot for social.
  • Vary your caption and headline. They shouldn’t say the same thing.
  • Make captions more attractive and luring.

 

Tips on writing the investigative narrative

Part of an ongoing blog series of notes and tips from the 2017 College Media Association/Associated Collegiate Press national convention. Search by topic or “collegemedia17” on this site to find more, or #collegemedia17 on Twitter. The following is from Neetish Basnet. 

Session: Writing the Investigative Narrative

By Gina Barton, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel and author

The session discussed ways to excel in investigative journalism and writing a narrative.

She said narrative storytelling is not only for features or fiction writing. News stories can benefit from narrative writing, as it intrigues the readers to learn more.

Tips:

  •       Think cinematically; make readers able to see the scene.
  •       Construct a plot, with lot of cliffhangers, twists and turns.
  •       Find a strong main character. Make the main character likable. “Nobody would want to read/learn about someone annoying.”
  •       Then make the protagonist face a complicated situation and find a resolution.

Continue reading

Improv your way to better interviews

Part of an ongoing blog series of notes and tips from the 2017 College Media Association/Associated Collegiate Press national convention. Search by topic or “collegemedia17” on this site to find more, or #collegemedia17 on Twitter. The following is from Chanel Sassoon. 

Ed and Chanel play an improv game. Photo: Audrey Henvey

This session was by far my favorite one. Here we discussed ways we can improve the atmosphere of our newsroom while learning ways to brush up on our interviewing skills. Andy Dehnart conducted the session. Basically, it was a series of games we could play in the newsroom, that are sometimes done in the improv scene. A game I really enjoyed involved students lining up and getting a keyword from the audience. Beginning with the given word, those in line had to make a story up with each person saying one word at a time.

This was a lot of fun, but Dehnart also related it back to how interviews work. Sometimes, we are too caught up in our own heads preparing for what our next question may be, versus just listening to the interview and preparing proper follow-up questions. (There were a lot of other games we played. I’d be happy to explain some other ones and possibly play them to begin our staff meetings.)

From Nick’s notebook: Starting a Broadcast

Part of an ongoing blog series of notes and tips from the 2017 College Media Association/Associated Collegiate Press national convention. Search by topic or “collegemedia17” on this site to find more, or #collegemedia17 on Twitter. The following is from Nick Tarrant. 

Starting a Broadcast

Students Jessica Kopp and Brooke Anderson created a newscast at their student paper at Missouri Western State University. This then became the birth of “Griffon News Network,” a weekly newscast produced within their own newsroom.

During the session, Kopp gave tips on how to start your own newscast, which I think are very helpful, especially for The Shorthorn. Continue reading